16 results for tag: water


New Water Justice Report: A Launching Point for Research and Policy Development 

It should go without saying that clean water is foundational to every aspect of our lives. But the reality is that there are far too many people in Oregon who struggle to have their water needs met every day. For some it’s poor water quality, for others, it’s lack of access to water, unaffordable water costs, or diminished natural resources.  These water justice challenges are highlighted in a new report that builds on our work in the Oregon Water Futures Collaborative and expands the base of evidence demonstrating how frontline communities are impacted by Oregon’s water challenges. Click the four arrows in the bottom right corner below to ...

EVs Are Not Just for Urban Commuters

The transition from gas to electric vehicles is now well underway. From electric cars, trucks, and busses, to e-bikes, e-scooters, and personal wheeled devices of all kinds, there are more and more electric options for getting around town. This transition is exciting to see because it’s essential to reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and battling climate change.  But what if “town” isn’t where you’re trying to get around? There are more electric vehicle (EV) models introduced all the time, but many people still have questions about whether an EV makes sense for the everyday needs of Oregon’s rural and agricultural communities which ...

Oregon Sets New Goals for Carbon Sequestration

Natural and Working Lands Proposal Healthy forests, waters, and agricultural lands are vital to Oregon’s economy, culture, and way of life. These natural and working lands often come to mind as vital resources in need of protection from climate impacts, but they are also an essential part of the climate solution. The science is clear: in order to avoid climate catastrophe, we must radically transform the way we use our land — from how we grow our food to how we manage our forests. Recognizing this need, Governor Brown directed the Oregon Global Warming Commission to work in concert with our state natural resource agencies to develop and ...

Hold The Salt: Options For Keeping Your Sidewalk Ice-Free

Winter weather in Oregon can be unpredictable. With this latest cold snap, it is time to start thinking about how we combat snow/ice on our sidewalks and driveways. The cost of so much salt Salt is used in many parts of the country because it lowers the freezing temperature of water and therefore can help accelerate the melting process of snow and ice. However, after it’s spread on roads or sidewalks, all of that salt has to go somewhere, and most of it washes into the storm sewer and gets deposited into the nearest river.  There, it can harm freshwater fish, frogs and other wildlife that aren’t acclimated to salty water, and can reduce ...

“Clean water = humanity”

Bringing people together to dance, celebrate Oregon, and start a conversation about clean water

Restoring Hamilton Creek: The Soltaus’ Story

As early spring blooms pop open and a great blue heron takes off across the water, Glen Soltau walks the trails on his property along Hamilton Creek outside of Lebanon, Ore. When Glen and his wife, Leslie, bought the property in 1992, Hamilton Creek was overrun with invasive blackberries, some growing as tall as 10-12 feet high, and cows walked in the streambed disrupting fish habitat and eroding the banks. Now rows of native willow, dogwood and elderberry have replaced the blackberries. Indian plum provides an early season nectar source for hummingbirds. Beavers build seasonal dams that increase the area for Glen and Leslie to paddle their kayaks. ...

Speak Up for Water!

If you care about clean and abundant water, we hope you will make your voice heard at an open house this June. At these open houses, the three state agencies responsible for protecting Oregon’s water and making sure we have enough water to go around will: share information on initiatives to prepare for drought, protect water instream for fish, reduce pesticide runoff, and more ask for public input on what to prioritize as they update the state’s Integrated Water Resources Strategy (IWRS) Sure, “Integrated Water Resources Strategy” is a wonky name, but the IWRS is a critical plan for ensuring that Oregon’s waterways are clean and ...

Common Questions About Lead In School Water

What’s the news? Schools are finding high levels of the toxic heavy metal lead in drinking water, coming from pipes, solder or plumbing fixtures that contain lead. It’s not the first time that this problem came to the Portland school district’s attention. As far back as 2001, tests in Portland schools revealed high levels of lead and fixtures were shut down until they could be replaced or filters installed. Yet the legacy of lead remains: In late spring 2016, lead was found in many Portland schools, in Beaverton schools and in Eugene. Where is the lead coming from? Lead contamination typically happens when water corrodes lead ...

What is the biggest challenge we face on water in 2016 and beyond?

In preparation for our May 4th Business Forum on Water, OEC Water Program Director Samantha Murray got a chance to sit down and talk to national expert Robert Glennon about our evolving relationship with water in a changing climate.   SM: How do you think our relationship with water will change in the coming decades? RG: We will have to confront scarcity. At the moment, we Americans are spoiled. When we turn on the taps, out comes a plentiful supply of water for less than we pay for cable television or cell phone service. SM: What is the biggest challenge we face on water in 2016 and beyond? RG: We have a proud and virtually ...

How’s your drinking water?

The 2015 crisis in Flint, MI might have you wondering: Is there lead in my drinking water? And what else is in there that could harm my family’s health? It’s worth taking the time to find out. Where do you get your water? There are thousands of individual water systems in Oregon—2,600 are public and hundreds of others private. Some serve communities, and others serve individual hospitals, schools, campgrounds and more. The 54 largest public community water systems, like those in Portland and Salem, serve 70% of Oregonians. Another 7% of Oregonians get their water from much smaller community systems, serving as few as 10 households. All ...