16 results for tag: transportation


Better transit: Keeping Oregon Moving

Oregonians will soon have more bus service, thanks to a first-time stable, significant and statewide source of funding for public transit (part of the 2017 "Keep Oregon Moving" transportation package championed by Oregon Environmental Council and our allies).From Kayak Public Transit serving the Pendleton-Umatilla area to RVTD serving the Rogue Valley, from Ride the Wave serving Tillamook County to CET serving the Bend area, transit agencies large and small are planning new and enhanced service that will make transit a desirable lifestyle choice, better serve the transit dependent, provide access to affordable housing, support economic developm...

Transportation Options

One in four Oregonians can’t drive due to age or disability. Many others can’t afford a car. And most of us want more transportation options so that not every trip has to be behind the wheel of an automobile.Oregon Environmental Council advances alternatives to driving alone. We helped forward policies that cleared the way for innovative car-sharing programs and for pay-as-you-drive insurance, which rewards drivers who put fewer miles on their car. Most recently, we worked with our allies to influence the transportation package passed by the 2017 state legislature, winning:✓ A first-time, significant, dedicated source of funding for ...

Push to pass Oregon’s transportation package

The 2017 legislative session is drawing to a close, but we still have an opportunity to make a historic investment in a transportation system for Oregon’s future. Tell Oregon lawmakers to take action...

Public Transit Makes the Difference: Maggie & Mika’s Story

We all know that public transit connects communities and helps people get where they need to go. But for some, it’s more than a help - it’s a vital resource.Maggie Ota can attest to this. A Forest Grove resident for the past three years, a big reason her family relocated to the area was because of the school district’s integrated programs for disabled students.In the Forest Grove School District her son, Mika, is able to attend a regular classroom with other kids - just like everyone else. This may not sound special, but in his previous school experience in California, disabled children were separated from other children - whether that ...

To Compete, Oregon Needs Modern Transportation Options

Oregon competes on a global scale to attract a talented workforce and the companies that rely on it. Millennials and others now show greater preference for vibrant neighborhoods with options like walking, biking and transit, and companies are moving to these locations to access that talent. Meanwhile, Oregon transit districts can’t keep up with demand, jeopardizing our competitiveness and the ability of those who can’t afford or aren’t able to drive to get to work and meet other daily needs. In many communities, it is unsafe to bicycle or walk. Gas and diesel are making our air unhealthy to breathe and changing our climate. To meet Oregonians’ ...

Smoother Road Ahead: Two Transportation Measures Pass in Oregon

Transit and safe streets will get a boost thanks to the passage of two measures on the May 2016 ballot, making it easier and safer for Oregonians to get around. OEC was proud to endorse both of these measures, and we are celebrating their success!In Southern Oregon, voters said YES to 15-141, which provides funding to restore and expand bus service in Ashland, Medford, Central Point, Jacksonville, Talent, Phoenix and White City. Given that the state of Oregon only contributes 3% to local transit operations (compared with an average state contribution of over 24% nationally), local measures like these are essential for keeping critical public ...

4 Reasons to Pledge Your YES Vote for Rogue Valley Transit

On May 17, Rogue Valley residents will have the opportunity to support their community by voting for a local transit levy.Local funding rates for Rogue Valley Transportation District (RVTD) haven’t increased in over 30 years, crippling the district’s ability to meet people’s needs. Buses are less frequent, and if you want to take the bus on the weekend or in the evening, tough luck!We can place part of the blame on the fact that Oregon lags far behind other states in supporting the daily operations of its local transit systems. From Basin Transit Service in Klamath Falls to TriMet in the Portland metro area, bus drivers and rail operat...

Attend a transportation forum in your neck of the woods!

Governor Brown’s Transportation Vision Panel is hosting a series of eleven regional forums across the state. We encourage our members to attend and speak up for eco-friendly, people-focused transportation.January 4: The Dalles January 7: Keizer January 13: Eugene January 14: Redmond January 25: John Day January 28: Albany February 12: Klamath Falls March 8: White City March 10: Tillamook March 11: Coquille March 14: PortlandWe all know how important transportation is. It provides us with access to goods, services, recreation, jobs, and other people. It touches each one of us every day. But past decisions have led to a transportat...

Clean Air and Good Roads at Odds No More

Transportation Should be Considered On Its Own MeritsPortland, OR – June 25, 2015: Today, Oregon’s Governor confirmed what had become clear to many over the last week: Oregonians don’t have to choose between good roads and clean air. Representatives of groups as disparate as Oregon’s schools and utility ratepayers objected to a proposed “replacement” for clean air legislation that had been tacked on to a transportation bill. Legislators rejected the package and decided much needed transportation funding should be considered on its own merits.“Oregonians deserve clean air and safe roads. To pit one against the other is a false ...

5 Surprising Things I Learned from Bike Commuting

By Simon TamThough I grew up after Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band’s main era, the Boss nevertheless resonated with my generation: freedom was tied with the roaring engine of an American car. For most of my life, that was my belief–at the age of sixteen, I promptly received my driver’s license and started driving to and from school (I could have walked). Throughout most of my career I depended on my car. I believed that my car was the most versatile, comfortable, and convenient option for every situation, even though I was victim to ever-increasing gas prices, parking fees (and parking tickets), and traffic jams. Was Thunder Road ...