22 results for tag: transportation


Climate-Friendly Communities Don’t Magically Appear

Oregon Environmental Council and 1000 Friends of Oregon have a long history of partnership, especially working together to advance compact community design with a myriad of reliable alternatives to driving. When people live close to their daily destinations and have lots of transportation options, we can significantly curb climate pollution from everyday travel. And the good news is that climate-friendly communities have lots of other benefits: the air is cleaner, the costs of getting around are lower, it’s easier to get exercise by walking and biking, they are cheaper to build and maintain, and--because they use less space--precious farm and ...

Transportation Pricing for Equitable Mobility

The roads belong to the public. We own the right-of-way, the sidewalks and curbs and the street.

More than a decade of work will not be silenced.

2019 has been a tumultuous year for Oregonians and our environment. As we look to the future, we remain more committed than ever to the idea that people coming together with passion and perseverance can positively alter the course of the future. There is much work yet to do: In the last legislative session, the Oregon legislature failed to vote on the Clean Energy Jobs bill. It was a disappointing outcome after an inspiring show of support for the bill over many years. More than a decade of work will not be silenced. The crucial work of Oregon Environmental Council has always been—and will always be—fueled by the broad support of our members ...

Transportation Transformation: The Writing Is On The Wall

Greenhouse gas emissions aren’t something you can easily feel or smell or see in your daily life. It’s hard for us to get a sense of what the volume is, and whether it’s going up or down. That’s why it’s so important to track the measurements to see what’s working and what isn’t working On September 18, the City of Portland released a report on greenhouse gas emissions in Multnomah County from 1990 to 2017. This report tells us that some things are working, though not quickly enough, and some things are working much worse than others. Here’s the good news: Emissions are down nearly 40% from 1990 levels, even though the population ...

What does clean air mean to you?

Oregon Environmental Council is celebrating Park(ing) Day on September 20, 2019. Park(ing) Day is a global event that allows us to reclaim our public space and imagine what we could do with them if we weren’t using them to store cars. Roadways used to be spaces for pedestrians, but with the advent of the automobile, our relationship to the “public right-of-way” has changed. On Park(ing) Day, groups and individuals adopt parking spaces around Portland for a day to celebrate, learn, relax, and enjoy our public right-of-way with art, activities, living room spaces and more. For our first ever Park(ing) Day, we wanted to honor our core values ...

Do everything

For any person or organization to try to “do something” about the climate crisis, the problem can feel overwhelmingly huge and complex. Everything we do tugs on something else, and the struggle to find the “right way” to make a difference feels impossible. Announce you’re doing something on social media or at a party, and people are likely to inform you of all the ways you’re taking the wrong approach. The thing is, we need to do everything. Everything helps, and we can’t afford to leave anything undone. We can’t choose one thing off the climate crisis list and leave the rest for later. As an example of this, Oregon Environm...

Better transit: Keeping Oregon Moving

Oregonians will soon have more bus service, thanks to a first-time stable, significant and statewide source of funding for public transit (part of the 2017 "Keep Oregon Moving" transportation package championed by Oregon Environmental Council and our allies). From Kayak Public Transit serving the Pendleton-Umatilla area to RVTD serving the Rogue Valley, from Ride the Wave serving Tillamook County to CET serving the Bend area, transit agencies large and small are planning new and enhanced service that will make transit a desirable lifestyle choice, better serve the transit dependent, provide access to affordable housing, support economic developm...

Transportation Options

One in four Oregonians can’t drive due to age or disability. Many others can’t afford a car. And most of us want more transportation options so that not every trip has to be behind the wheel of an automobile. Oregon Environmental Council advances alternatives to driving alone. We helped forward policies that cleared the way for innovative car-sharing programs and for pay-as-you-drive insurance, which rewards drivers who put fewer miles on their car. Most recently, we worked with our allies to influence the transportation package passed by the 2017 state legislature, winning: ✓ A first-time, significant, dedicated source of funding for ...

Push to pass Oregon’s transportation package

The 2017 legislative session is drawing to a close, but we still have an opportunity to make a historic investment in a transportation system for Oregon’s future. Tell Oregon lawmakers to take action...

Public Transit Makes the Difference: Maggie & Mika’s Story

We all know that public transit connects communities and helps people get where they need to go. But for some, it’s more than a help - it’s a vital resource. Maggie Ota can attest to this. A Forest Grove resident for the past three years, a big reason her family relocated to the area was because of the school district’s integrated programs for disabled students. In the Forest Grove School District her son, Mika, is able to attend a regular classroom with other kids - just like everyone else. This may not sound special, but in his previous school experience in California, disabled children were separated from other children - whether that ...