15 results for tag: toxics


Alert: your right to know is at risk

Just as Oregon begins to find out how toxic chemicals occur in children's products, an industry-backed bill could block that information.Industry groups are behind the proposed "Accurate Labels Act" ( H.R. 6022/S. 3019 ), first introduced in 2018, which would make it easier for manufacturers to hide chemicals linked to cancer and other health harm. It would block Oregon's Toxic Free Kids program—yet Oregon's Representative Schrader is one of the co-sponsors.See details on the Accurate Labels Act and how it would block Oregon's law. And then take action:Your browser does not support iframes. Please visit <a href="https://oecon...

Storify: Lobby for Clean Air Day

Today dozens of clean air partners, including high school students, shared their love for Oregon’s air by handing out Valentines to every legislator at the state capitol in Salem. The notes attached included a “sweet reminder” on why it's important for Oregon to do something this session

Lawmaking Insider: What It Takes To Put Laws Into Action

It takes hard work, collaboration, and patience to pass new laws in Oregon’s legislature. Sometimes, after years of trying, countless hearings, thousands of emails, and many meetings, we succeed–with gratitude for the help from OEC supporters. And when we are successful, we can transform the system to reflect Oregon’s values.Oregon’s Toxic Free Kids Act is a notable example of our success. In 2015, we partnered with businesses, parents, doctors, legislators, and individuals – including many of you - to create one of the nation’s strongest consumer product safety laws. It was a hard won victory for Oregon’s kids, our families, and our ...

Congrats to Multnomah County! OEC Healthy Purchasing Champion 2016

We’re pleased to announce that Multnomah County is the recipient of OEC’s first annual “Healthy Purchasing Champion” award for 2016. The County has demonstrated excellence and leadership in the pursuit of safer products through public procurement. While a number of local governments completed an impressive scope of work in the arena of purchasing safer products over the last year, Multnomah County rose above in their level of implementation.Oregon Environmental Council works directly with a group of local governments and higher education institutions through our Healthy Purchasing Coalition. The purpose of the Coalition is to protect human ...

Common Questions About Lead In School Water

What’s the news?Schools are finding high levels of the toxic heavy metal lead in drinking water, coming from pipes, solder or plumbing fixtures that contain lead.It’s not the first time that this problem came to the Portland school district’s attention. As far back as 2001, tests in Portland schools revealed high levels of lead and fixtures were shut down until they could be replaced or filters installed. Yet the legacy of lead remains: In late spring 2016, lead was found in many Portland schools, in Beaverton schools and in Eugene.Where is the lead coming from?Lead contamination typically happens when water corrodes lead ...

Non-toxic tips to know before you buy furniture

Thanks, KGW! The local news is letting Portlanders know that they can now buy upholstered furniture made without toxic flame retardant chemicals.For decades, furniture-makers who use polyurethane foam padding have had little choice but to soak it in toxic flame retardant chemicals. Now, the law has changed—and it’s easier both to make and to identify furniture that is free of these chemicals linked to memory, learning, IQ, hormonal system and fertility problems.And thanks to a strong united voice from consumers and MindTheStore.org you’ll find a tag like the one pictured here in far more furniture stores, including Macy’s.If ...

Toxics in Washington (D.C.)

We all deserve to live, work and play in healthy, safe environments. That’s why Oregon Environmental Council brings Oregonians together to reduce harmful chemicals in our air, water, food and in our homes and buildings. We promote policies to protect Oregonians from unnecessary toxics and unite health experts and caregivers to create safer places to learn and grow.The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), one of the main federal laws that regulates chemical safety in the U.S., is woefully out of date. Created in 1976, TSCA desperately needs to be overhauled to reflect the latest health science and medical knowledge about chemicals that we come ...

A shoppertunity to be green

Earth friendly. Biocompatible. 99% natural. 100% Eco-conscious.The frustrating reality for shoppers today is that these labels don't mean anything. At least that's what the Federal Trade Commission determined when setting green label guidelines in 2012.So what’s a shopper to do?OEC put together a list of best practices for shoppers to help reduce, re-use, recycle—and to reward good environmental stewards.If you're not already doing everything on this list, October is a great time to start! Get in on the Northwest Earth Institute's Eco-Challenge. Green Shopper's Checklist Download a copy here.ReduceAvoid PVC plastic ...

Oregon Passes Historic Toxics Protections

For Immediate Release: Oregon Passes Historic Toxics Protections Oregon Legislature Acts to Phase Out Known Hazardous Chemicals from Children’s ProductsSalem, OR – July 3, 2015: Today, the Oregon House cast a decisive and bipartisan vote in favor of the Toxic Free Kids Act (SB 478), a bill that requires manufacturers to disclose and phase out hazardous chemicals in consumer products targeted at children.“This law isn’t about regulating products that haven’t been made,” said Oregon State Senator Chris Edwards in an impassioned floor speech. “This law is about protecting children that haven’t been born.”A growing body ...

Family Ties and Toxic Free Generations

OEC’s Devon Downeysmith, OEC’s climate communications and outreach manager, and her dad, David Michael Smith, a veteran journalist and videographer, share a deep concern for the potential health hazards posed by the presence of toxic chemicals in many children’s toys, apparel and furniture. Dad and daughter agree that the debate over the issue has been going on far too long. It’s time to pass the Toxic Free Kids Act – a bill that will likely be up for a vote in the next week.Devon was born and raised in Portland and has lived there her entire life. Devon married her high school sweetheart, Bryce. They’re expecting their first child in ...