19 results for tag: toxics


Tell McDonald’s: Time to Take off the Toxic Gloves

With great market power comes great responsibility for customers' health.This summer Oregon Environmental Council helped gather samples for a research report that finds that some vinyl, or PVC, food service gloves contain toxic chemicals called phthalates (THAL-eights) that can leach into food—and some gloves from McDonald’s tested positive for these harmful chemicals.We’re joining with our partner groups across the nation in calling on McDonald’s, the top restaurant in the U.S., to be a market leader and switch away from using PVC gloves—the only way to ensure that food service gloves won’t contaminate diners’ meals with toxic ...

Oregon Health Authority Wrestles With Commitment to Transparency

At the most recent meeting of the Toxic Free Kids Act Rules Advisory Committee the chemical industry publicly admitted that many chemicals in kids’ products may lack key data on their safety. This sort of disregard for product safety and transparency is sadly a routine page out of the chemical industry's playbook. The issue of transparency was another hot topic during the most recent rules meeting. While it's a common move for industry associations and manufacturers to refuse to provide transparency on chemical ingredients and safety assessments, it's less common to see it from state agencies. The heart of the matter under consideration by ...

Protect Oregon’s drinking water from toxic PFAS: Ask Congressman Walden to designate PFAS as a “hazardous chemical”

Per-and Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a category of hazardous chemicals that are currently designated as “contaminants” by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  To protect human health, Congress must designate PFAS as hazardous chemicals, which will speed up the identification, cleanup and monitoring of PFAS contaminated sites under federal Superfund law.What are PFAS and why should you be concerned?PFAS are a group of 47,000 synthetic chemicals that are known as ‘forever chemicals’ due to their persistent nature in the environment. They easily move through air and soil and contaminate clean water sources, and because ...

Plastic Un-fantastic

The toxic effects of plastics pollution on human health —Belinda McFadgen, for OECIn early March of 2019, a Cuvier’s beaked whale washed up dead in the Philippines. The whale had died of gastric shock, brought on by the 88 lbs. of plastic bags found in its stomach.The sheer volume of plastic waste and its brutal impact on marine wildlife is shocking. But just as disturbing is the emerging story of how the toxicity of plastic pollution is affecting human health and the health of the planet as a whole. A growing understanding of toxic effects More than twenty years ago, a health hazard from widespread plastic use made headlines. In 1993, ...

Alert: your right to know is at risk

Just as Oregon begins to find out how toxic chemicals occur in children's products, an industry-backed bill could block that information.Industry groups are behind the proposed "Accurate Labels Act" ( H.R. 6022/S. 3019 ), first introduced in 2018, which would make it easier for manufacturers to hide chemicals linked to cancer and other health harm. It would block Oregon's Toxic Free Kids program—yet Oregon's Representative Schrader is one of the co-sponsors.See details on the Accurate Labels Act and how it would block Oregon's law. And then take action:Your browser does not support iframes. Please visit <a href="https://oecon...

Storify: Lobby for Clean Air Day

Today dozens of clean air partners, including high school students, shared their love for Oregon’s air by handing out Valentines to every legislator at the state capitol in Salem. The notes attached included a “sweet reminder” on why it's important for Oregon to do something this session

Lawmaking Insider: What It Takes To Put Laws Into Action

It takes hard work, collaboration, and patience to pass new laws in Oregon’s legislature. Sometimes, after years of trying, countless hearings, thousands of emails, and many meetings, we succeed–with gratitude for the help from OEC supporters. And when we are successful, we can transform the system to reflect Oregon’s values.Oregon’s Toxic Free Kids Act is a notable example of our success. In 2015, we partnered with businesses, parents, doctors, legislators, and individuals – including many of you - to create one of the nation’s strongest consumer product safety laws. It was a hard won victory for Oregon’s kids, our families, and our ...

Congrats to Multnomah County! OEC Healthy Purchasing Champion 2016

We’re pleased to announce that Multnomah County is the recipient of OEC’s first annual “Healthy Purchasing Champion” award for 2016. The County has demonstrated excellence and leadership in the pursuit of safer products through public procurement. While a number of local governments completed an impressive scope of work in the arena of purchasing safer products over the last year, Multnomah County rose above in their level of implementation.Oregon Environmental Council works directly with a group of local governments and higher education institutions through our Healthy Purchasing Coalition. The purpose of the Coalition is to protect human ...

Common Questions About Lead In School Water

What’s the news?Schools are finding high levels of the toxic heavy metal lead in drinking water, coming from pipes, solder or plumbing fixtures that contain lead.It’s not the first time that this problem came to the Portland school district’s attention. As far back as 2001, tests in Portland schools revealed high levels of lead and fixtures were shut down until they could be replaced or filters installed. Yet the legacy of lead remains: In late spring 2016, lead was found in many Portland schools, in Beaverton schools and in Eugene.Where is the lead coming from?Lead contamination typically happens when water corrodes lead ...

Non-toxic tips to know before you buy furniture

Thanks, KGW! The local news is letting Portlanders know that they can now buy upholstered furniture made without toxic flame retardant chemicals.For decades, furniture-makers who use polyurethane foam padding have had little choice but to soak it in toxic flame retardant chemicals. Now, the law has changed—and it’s easier both to make and to identify furniture that is free of these chemicals linked to memory, learning, IQ, hormonal system and fertility problems.And thanks to a strong united voice from consumers and MindTheStore.org you’ll find a tag like the one pictured here in far more furniture stores, including Macy’s.If ...