3 results for tag: toxics in products


Tell outdoor retailer REI to take toxic ‘forever chemicals’ out of their apparel!

From waterproof jackets to boots, outdoor gear sold at REI and other retailers like Columbia Sportswear contains ‘forever chemicals’ called PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances). And recent science shows us that the production, use, and disposal of these products pollute people and the planet. Chemicals also make their way into our waterways through the washing and laundry process.  Exposure to PFAS has been linked to harmful health impacts, including cancer, hormone disruption, and immune system problems. Many of OEC’s staff and members love to recreate outside and in the wilderness.  Our outdoor gear should not contribute to the ...

UPDATE: Victory! Judge dismisses Oregon Toxic Free Kids Act Litigation

As we reported at the start of the new year (see below), American Apparel, the Toy Association, and its member coalition- Safe to Play, had filed a lawsuit during the week of Christmas, claiming that Oregon’s Toxic Free Kids Act (TFKA) is preempted based on the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA) and Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA). Thankfully earlier this summer, the federal district court in Portland, Oregon dismissed the toy industry's lawsuit. Specifically, Judge Simon held that at least 69 chemicals regulated in Oregon’s Toxic Free Kids Act are not even addressed in the federal statutes. Therefore, the Toxic Free Kids Act is not ...

Grinchlike behavior: Toy Association delivers lawsuit against safer toys just in time for the New Year

In one of the most Grinch-like moves of 2021, American Apparel, the Toy Association, and its member coalition- Safe to Play, filed a lawsuit during the week of Christmas, in an effort to ensure that they can continue delivering toxic toys to Oregon kids.  They claim that the final rules of Oregon’s Toxic Free Kids Act (TFKA) is preempted based on the  Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA) and Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA), and that compliance with phaseouts, especially if they have to pay the fees to apply for waivers, will cause them “irreparable harm.” This move came six and a half years after TFKA was enacted, and over 9 months ...