17 results for tag: toxic free kids act


Tell McDonald’s: Time to Take off the Toxic Gloves

With great market power comes great responsibility for customers' health.This summer Oregon Environmental Council helped gather samples for a research report that finds that some vinyl, or PVC, food service gloves contain toxic chemicals called phthalates (THAL-eights) that can leach into food—and some gloves from McDonald’s tested positive for these harmful chemicals.We’re joining with our partner groups across the nation in calling on McDonald’s, the top restaurant in the U.S., to be a market leader and switch away from using PVC gloves—the only way to ensure that food service gloves won’t contaminate diners’ meals with toxic ...

Oregon Health Authority Wrestles With Commitment to Transparency

At the most recent meeting of the Toxic Free Kids Act Rules Advisory Committee the chemical industry publicly admitted that many chemicals in kids’ products may lack key data on their safety. This sort of disregard for product safety and transparency is sadly a routine page out of the chemical industry's playbook. The issue of transparency was another hot topic during the most recent rules meeting. While it's a common move for industry associations and manufacturers to refuse to provide transparency on chemical ingredients and safety assessments, it's less common to see it from state agencies. The heart of the matter under consideration by ...

Alert: your right to know is at risk

Just as Oregon begins to find out how toxic chemicals occur in children's products, an industry-backed bill could block that information.Industry groups are behind the proposed "Accurate Labels Act" ( H.R. 6022/S. 3019 ), first introduced in 2018, which would make it easier for manufacturers to hide chemicals linked to cancer and other health harm. It would block Oregon's Toxic Free Kids program—yet Oregon's Representative Schrader is one of the co-sponsors.See details on the Accurate Labels Act and how it would block Oregon's law. And then take action:Your browser does not support iframes. Please visit <a href="https://oecon...

Lawmaking Insider: What It Takes To Put Laws Into Action

It takes hard work, collaboration, and patience to pass new laws in Oregon’s legislature. Sometimes, after years of trying, countless hearings, thousands of emails, and many meetings, we succeed–with gratitude for the help from OEC supporters. And when we are successful, we can transform the system to reflect Oregon’s values.Oregon’s Toxic Free Kids Act is a notable example of our success. In 2015, we partnered with businesses, parents, doctors, legislators, and individuals – including many of you - to create one of the nation’s strongest consumer product safety laws. It was a hard won victory for Oregon’s kids, our families, and our ...

Breakthrough! National toxics reform

This week, Congress reformed the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act, changing the way our nation manages toxic chemicals. It's a major overhaul of the only bedrock environmental law that has never been amended. Champions like Senator Merkley are to be commended for standing up to industry interests to defend public health provisions.We still need to address flaws in the new law that undermine its effectiveness. And it will take vigilance and funding to ensure that the this reform is implemented in ways that truly protect public health and protect our most vulnerable.States like Oregon, and a broad network of advocates including Oregon Environ...

Toxics in Washington (D.C.)

We all deserve to live, work and play in healthy, safe environments. That’s why Oregon Environmental Council brings Oregonians together to reduce harmful chemicals in our air, water, food and in our homes and buildings. We promote policies to protect Oregonians from unnecessary toxics and unite health experts and caregivers to create safer places to learn and grow.The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), one of the main federal laws that regulates chemical safety in the U.S., is woefully out of date. Created in 1976, TSCA desperately needs to be overhauled to reflect the latest health science and medical knowledge about chemicals that we come ...

Oregon Passes Historic Toxics Protections

For Immediate Release: Oregon Passes Historic Toxics Protections Oregon Legislature Acts to Phase Out Known Hazardous Chemicals from Children’s ProductsSalem, OR – July 3, 2015: Today, the Oregon House cast a decisive and bipartisan vote in favor of the Toxic Free Kids Act (SB 478), a bill that requires manufacturers to disclose and phase out hazardous chemicals in consumer products targeted at children.“This law isn’t about regulating products that haven’t been made,” said Oregon State Senator Chris Edwards in an impassioned floor speech. “This law is about protecting children that haven’t been born.”A growing body ...

Family Ties and Toxic Free Generations

OEC’s Devon Downeysmith, OEC’s climate communications and outreach manager, and her dad, David Michael Smith, a veteran journalist and videographer, share a deep concern for the potential health hazards posed by the presence of toxic chemicals in many children’s toys, apparel and furniture. Dad and daughter agree that the debate over the issue has been going on far too long. It’s time to pass the Toxic Free Kids Act – a bill that will likely be up for a vote in the next week.Devon was born and raised in Portland and has lived there her entire life. Devon married her high school sweetheart, Bryce. They’re expecting their first child in ...

Three science mistakes that non-scientists make

I’m a sucker for science. I am inclined to believe it. So when politics and science get whipped into a froth and poured over a debate about protecting health and the environment, I need a refresher on what science can and cannot do.

Groundbreaking Bracelet Tests Toxics in Our Daily Life

"Do you know what chemicals you're exposed to on a daily basis? Pollutants we encounter every day come from any number of sources – cars, factories, shampoos, lotions, carpets and more. Some chemicals are benign but others could be hazardous to your health..." So begins an article about the toxics around us.This week, KGW Investigates examines a new bracelet that can measure the toxics that we're exposed to in our daily life. Reporter Keely Chalmers and OEC Emerging Leaders Board Member Bethany Thomas are wearing these revolutionary bracelets developed by OSU to examine what chemicals they are exposed to in their everyday life."The ...