4 results for tag: stormwater


Protecting clean water at home

The choices you make in your yard can make a big difference to the health of local streams, wildlife and our drinking water. Before you think about spraying weed killer or reseeding your lawn this fall, consider these tips for a low-maintenance landscape.

Low Impact Development: Managing the Rain

When rain falls onto Oregon's streets, sidewalks, parking lots and rooftops, it picks up pollutants in its path, gathering volume and speed until a storm drain pipes it underground or into a stream. This stormwater runoff causes water pollution, flooding, stream bank erosion, depleted groundwater, and habitat loss for fish and wildlife.Using plants and soil to capture and filter stormwater runoff and allows the cleaned water to recharge our groundwater supplies, the way it does in nature. Managing stormwater this way is called low-impact development (LID). These development practices that reduce stormwater runoff by preserving existing natural ...

Stormwater Solutions

When rain falls onto the hard surfaces of streets, sidewalks, parking lots and rooftops, it picks up pollutants in its path, gathering volume and speed until a storm drain pipes it underground or into a stream. Stormwater runoff causes water pollution, localized flooding, stream bank erosion, reduced groundwater levels, and habitat loss for fish and wildlife.In 2007, OEC convened a statewide task force on reducing urban runoff and produced a report called "Stormwater Solutions: Turning Oregon's Rain Back into a Resource."  The report describes how stormwater impacts Oregon's streams and rivers and includes a set of recommendations for reducing ...

Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater harvesting is a stormwater management and water conservation strategy that is under-utilized in the Northwest. Rainwater harvesting reduces demand on other water sources by providing an alternative water source for human uses, and it mitigates damaging runoff from our stormwater system. Rainwater harvesting systems vary from simple rain barrels to cisterns capable of storing tens of thousands of gallons. Small systems like rain barrels are an easy way to get started and give rainwater harvesting a try.  Check out this detailed guide to building a simple rain barrel.Of course, with our wet winters in Oregon, rain barrels will only ...