4 results for tag: Medford


Speak Up for Water!

If you care about clean and abundant water, we hope you will make your voice heard at an open house this June. At these open houses, the three state agencies responsible for protecting Oregon’s water and making sure we have enough water to go around will:share information on initiatives to prepare for drought, protect water instream for fish, reduce pesticide runoff, and more ask for public input on what to prioritize as they update the state’s Integrated Water Resources Strategy (IWRS)Sure, “Integrated Water Resources Strategy” is a wonky name, but the IWRS is a critical plan for ensuring that Oregon’s waterways are clean and ...

Guest blog: Rogue Basin Climate Summit, Oct. 13 & 14

by Alan Journet, Co-facilitator SOCAN alanjournet@gmail.com | 541-301-4107Everyone loves where they live, and we in Southern Oregon are no exception. Why is this area so beautiful? The answer is revealed in a trip to Grants Pass—warm summers, mild temperatures, four seasons. It's the climate. The forests, woodlands, farms, wineries, and rivers we enjoy are here thanks to our unique climate.But the Rogue Basin has been experiencing four decades of troubling climate trends. Data from Medford reveal the city has warmed nearly 2 degrees Fahrenheit over the last century. Like much of the country, 2014 was a warm year. Average temperatures ...

What you should know about well water

If you are like more than 70% of Oregonians, some of your drinking water comes from wells and other groundwater sources. Approximately 23% of Oregonians rely on private wells as their primary source of water – to drink, to bathe in, and to cook their food. Yet this valuable water source can become contaminated.Earlier this month the Medford Mail Tribune took a deep look at one such contaminant affecting Jackson County: arsenic.Jackson County is not alone. Similar problems exist across the state, but for years state agencies have not had the resources to monitor groundwater quality, so there is little information about the extent of the ...

Pesticide Stewardship Program

Just over a year ago, Oregon established a Pesticide Stewardship Partnership (PSP) Program that helps to ensure Oregon’s water quality through pesticide monitoring, training and tools for farmers to help reduce the amount of pesticide running off into our streams and rivers, and community collection events for safe disposal of pesticides.The PSP Program is a uniquely collaborative, Oregon solution to reduce unsafe levels of pesticides in our rivers, lakes and streams. Voluntary pesticide stewardship partnerships have helped avoid the need for a regulatory approach in some areas, providing more flexibility and control to land managers, and ...