12 results for tag: drinking water


#MyWaterWhy – Stacey Dalgaard

As we kick of the 2019 Oregon World Water Day campaign, hear from OEC's Water Outreach Director about why water matters for our future.

Waters Out of Whack

Harmful algae blooms are becoming more common. This is the story of 8 bodies of water in Oregon and the neighboring communities affected by toxic algae growth.

How do we handle algae?

The water crisis in Salem is a wake-up call to the growing threat of harmful algae blooms in Oregon. How can we prevent these events from happening more in the future?

Protecting the Source

Do you know where your drinking water comes from? Whether it comes from the ground or a local river or reservoir? Who or what you live downstream from?

Wildfires and our water resources

As we face a future with more wildfires, it's time to start looking beyond the burn. Even after flames die down, our watersheds are still at increased risk.

Summer with a side of algae

Add Odell Lake and Ross Island to the list. As summer heats up, harmful algae blooms are taking off across the state. Now is the time to talk about why this is happening and what we can do to stop it.

Restoring Hamilton Creek: The Soltaus’ Story

As early spring blooms pop open and a great blue heron takes off across the water, Glen Soltau walks the trails on his property along Hamilton Creek outside of Lebanon, Ore. When Glen and his wife, Leslie, bought the property in 1992, Hamilton Creek was overrun with invasive blackberries, some growing as tall as 10-12 feet high, and cows walked in the streambed disrupting fish habitat and eroding the banks.Now rows of native willow, dogwood and elderberry have replaced the blackberries. Indian plum provides an early season nectar source for hummingbirds. Beavers build seasonal dams that increase the area for Glen and Leslie to paddle their kayaks. ...

Are Oregon’s schoolchildren drinking lead-laden water?

NOTE: Please see our updated Q&A to learn answers to common questions about the issue here.Anyone who interacts with a young child can see how quickly they learn. Kids absorb everything around them. But if there is the toxic heavy metal lead in their drinking water, what does that mean for their future? What does it mean for Oregon?As of March 2016, lead has been found in the drinking water of nearly a dozen Oregon Schools, some with levels up to twelve times the maximum amount allowed by current regulations (15 ppb). Just a couple days ago, lead was discovered in the drinking fountains at Beaverton Middle School. We know lead is ...

Introducing our 2016 legislative agenda

Oregon Environmental Council has been a leader in every legislative session since our founding in 1968. Our steady presence and our ability to forge consensus across party lines have led to creative and practical environmental protections. In 2016, OEC will once again be hard at work in Salem to protect Oregon’s environment and quality of life.Our priorities for this session include:The Clean Electricity & Coal Transition Plan (HB 4036) to transition Oregon off of coal-fired power while doubling the state’s commitment to new renewable energy to 50% The Healthy Climate Bill (SB 1574) to limit climate pollution and account for ...

What you should know about well water

If you are like more than 70% of Oregonians, some of your drinking water comes from wells and other groundwater sources. Approximately 23% of Oregonians rely on private wells as their primary source of water – to drink, to bathe in, and to cook their food. Yet this valuable water source can become contaminated.Earlier this month the Medford Mail Tribune took a deep look at one such contaminant affecting Jackson County: arsenic.Jackson County is not alone. Similar problems exist across the state, but for years state agencies have not had the resources to monitor groundwater quality, so there is little information about the extent of the ...