31 results for tag: clean water


White House Risks Health of Our Water and Our Communities

Yesterday the Trump Administration put the sources of drinking water for more than 4 million Oregonians at greater risk, along with the streams and wetlands that filter pollution and provide habitat for wildlife, by starting the process to repeal the Clean Water Rule.

Celebrating Oregon Scientists

In anticipation of this week's March for Science - we wanted to share with you a few scientists who we think are doing great things right here in Oregon.

Restoring Hamilton Creek: The Soltaus’ Story

As early spring blooms pop open and a great blue heron takes off across the water, Glen Soltau walks the trails on his property along Hamilton Creek outside of Lebanon, Ore. When Glen and his wife, Leslie, bought the property in 1992, Hamilton Creek was overrun with invasive blackberries, some growing as tall as 10-12 feet high, and cows walked in the streambed disrupting fish habitat and eroding the banks.Now rows of native willow, dogwood and elderberry have replaced the blackberries. Indian plum provides an early season nectar source for hummingbirds. Beavers build seasonal dams that increase the area for Glen and Leslie to paddle their kayaks. ...

REPORT: Oregon Faces Climate Threats; We Are Committed to Solutions

The Oregon Climate Change Research Institute just released their third Oregon Climate Assessment Report, and the results are foreboding.Off the top, it clearly states the problem: “burning fossil fuels to run our factories, heat our homes and drive our cars produces heat-trapping gasses that unequivocally warm the planet.” The report presents compelling evidence as to how our state is already experiencing the effects of climate change, and the various threats that lie ahead.Key takeaways:A majority of Oregonians are concerned about climate change: Two-thirds (67%) of Oregonians believe that climate change is happening (Howe et al., 2015). ...

Where Water Quality and Quantity Intersect

Guest Post by Steve SiegelIt is a hot summer day and you are off to your favorite swimming hole, joyfully anticipating your first leap into its crystal clear, refreshing water, followed by the magnificent shake of your body as you surface, spraying water in every direction. You can hardly wait, recklessly racing your dog to the water. You arrive to find a pool of brownish, greenish, stagnant water, barely knee deep. Skidding to a halt, you no longer want to even dip your toes into what you have found.When imaging a swimming hole, we don’t just think of a pool of deep water and we don’t just imagine clear, clean water. We think of both. ...

Speak Up for Water!

If you care about clean and abundant water, we hope you will make your voice heard at an open house this June. At these open houses, the three state agencies responsible for protecting Oregon’s water and making sure we have enough water to go around will:share information on initiatives to prepare for drought, protect water instream for fish, reduce pesticide runoff, and more ask for public input on what to prioritize as they update the state’s Integrated Water Resources Strategy (IWRS)Sure, “Integrated Water Resources Strategy” is a wonky name, but the IWRS is a critical plan for ensuring that Oregon’s waterways are clean and ...

Common Questions About Lead In School Water

What’s the news?Schools are finding high levels of the toxic heavy metal lead in drinking water, coming from pipes, solder or plumbing fixtures that contain lead.It’s not the first time that this problem came to the Portland school district’s attention. As far back as 2001, tests in Portland schools revealed high levels of lead and fixtures were shut down until they could be replaced or filters installed. Yet the legacy of lead remains: In late spring 2016, lead was found in many Portland schools, in Beaverton schools and in Eugene.Where is the lead coming from?Lead contamination typically happens when water corrodes lead ...

Is your septic tank leaking? We’ve got a bill for that!

OEC is celebrating Governor Brown's signing of SB 1563 this week for the benefit of Oregon's rivers, streams and coastal waters. This bill, sponsored by Senator Roblan, helps low- and middle-income families confront leaking or failing septic systems. It creates a low-interest loan program, to be administered by DEQ, for "repairing, upgrading or evaluating residential or small business on-site septic systems."Properly functioning septic systems treat sewage to minimize groundwater and surface water pollution--important for drinking water, healthy coasts, and healthy fish and shellfish. Septic systems which fail or malfunction can pollute Oregon’s ...

Are Oregon’s schoolchildren drinking lead-laden water?

NOTE: Please see our updated Q&A to learn answers to common questions about the issue here.Anyone who interacts with a young child can see how quickly they learn. Kids absorb everything around them. But if there is the toxic heavy metal lead in their drinking water, what does that mean for their future? What does it mean for Oregon?As of March 2016, lead has been found in the drinking water of nearly a dozen Oregon Schools, some with levels up to twelve times the maximum amount allowed by current regulations (15 ppb). Just a couple days ago, lead was discovered in the drinking fountains at Beaverton Middle School. We know lead is ...

Low Impact Development: Managing the Rain

When rain falls onto Oregon's streets, sidewalks, parking lots and rooftops, it picks up pollutants in its path, gathering volume and speed until a storm drain pipes it underground or into a stream. This stormwater runoff causes water pollution, flooding, stream bank erosion, depleted groundwater, and habitat loss for fish and wildlife.Using plants and soil to capture and filter stormwater runoff and allows the cleaned water to recharge our groundwater supplies, the way it does in nature. Managing stormwater this way is called low-impact development (LID). These development practices that reduce stormwater runoff by preserving existing natural ...