Oregon’s Transportation Bill

We created this helpful infographic to walk you through what’s proposed in Oregon’s transportation funding package, House Bill 2017-3.

Transportation bill offers key pieces for Oregon’s future + more work to be done

Related Posts
Filter by
Post Page
Water Conservation Featured Rural Partnerships Carbon Sequestration Agriculture Climate Protection OCAP News Water News Air Quality OCAP-Page Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Toxic Free Priorities People Toxics-Free Environments Policy OEC News/Updates/Events Media/PR/Statements
Sort by

Oregon Sets New Goals for Carbon Sequestration

Natural and Working Lands Proposal
January 14, 2022, 5:52 pm
klew

9

CLIMATE VICTORY! Oregon Climate Protection Program sets the path for a healthy climate future

Oregon just took one of its biggest steps ever toward reducing climate pollution and delivering a stable climate for the future. Oregon just took one of its biggest steps ever toward reducing climate pollution and delivering a stable climate for
December 16, 2021, 2:41 am
noraaoeconline-org

9

Road-trips, Representatives and Adventures in Eastern Oregon

Summer is road-trip time, and recently, OEC staff Karen Lewotsky (Water Policy and Rural Partnerships Director) and Morgan Gratz-Weiser (Legislative Director) headed southeast across Oregon to Crane, with stops along the way in Tumalo and Prineville. Why Crane? The gathering in Crane was organized by leading legislators and partner organizations Verde, Willamette
September 10, 2021, 8:24 pm
klew

9

New report elevates water justice in Oregon

A new report from the Oregon Water Futures Project reveals water challenges facing communities across the state, from water shortages, to living with unsafe water, watching sacred ecosystems disappear, and critical information gaps about clean water during emergencies. The report highlights key findings from community
September 2, 2021, 11:10 pm
stacey

9

Strengthening Oregon’s Climate Protection Program

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is getting closer to finalizing rules for a new Climate Protection Program. Over the past year, DEQ has made a number of positive changes to strengthen the rules; however, a few key policy design features still hang in the
August 31, 2021, 10:07 pm
noraaoeconline-org

9

silhouette of person in tractor working a field

Centering Frontline Voices: Oregon OSHA Enacts Heat & Smoke Rules

In a summer already marked by unprecedented temperatures and a devastating wildfire season, OEC and its partners pressed Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to adopt a health-first standard when it comes to protecting vulnerable workers from climate hazards. As part of EO-20-04 (OCAP), Governor Kate Brown directed Oregon OSHA to develop standards in order to protect frontline workers from excessive heat
August 11, 2021, 3:57 pm
jamie-pang

9

Oregon OSHA Enacts Emergency Heat Rules

A Joint Press Release – July 8, 2021 Contacts: Ira Cuello-Martinez, PCUN iracuello@pcun.org, (503) 851-5774 Kate Suisman, Northwest Justice Workers Project
July 13, 2021, 6:19 pm
jamie-pang

9

Oregon Climate Action Plan: 2021 Progress Report

March 26, 2021, 12:11 am
noraaoeconline-org

9

Celebrating Year 1 of the Oregon Climate Action Plan

March 10, 2021, 7:51 pm
noraaoeconline-org

9

Statement on Protecting Oregon’s Democratic Process

Today, Oregon Environmental Council sent a strong statement to Oregon’s legislative leadership
January 21, 2021, 10:49 pm
dianan

9


4 Replies to "Oregon's Transportation Bill"

  • Garlynn Woodsong
    June 7, 2017 (4:12 pm)

    Why is there no mention of the climate impact of this bill, either by the Leg analysis, or especially by OEC’s breakdown of the bill’s impacts???

    • Amy Lewin
      June 7, 2017 (10:47 pm)

      A great point to make Garlynn! We absolutely agree that the package must reduce GHGs. Here’s a response from our policy experts:

      With all the pieces just coming together last week, there’s not time to do a full GHG analysis; but prior to the bill being released our team did look at the expected transit and EV investment. What we know from that analysis is that the transit investment is important and that it moves the GHG needle the most if the buses are electrified over time. In fact, there’s a co-benefit to conversion to electric buses, which is that an EV bus fleet requires less service and has far lower fuel costs than a diesel fleet, thus those savings can be plowed back into additional transit service. The package does require the state’s largest transit agencies to move to alternative fuels. With regard to the EV analysis, it showed that we need a larger investment in EV incentives than is currently in the package or in the EV companion bill, HB 2704. So we must push hard to make sure that the investment begins this session and is upped over time. Another important climate piece of the package is bike/ped (including Safe Routes to School), which is funded in the package but needs improvements that our coalition is pushing for.

      The biggest climate question is the new road capacity funded in the package. New capacity fills up quickly if not managed, so we’re pleased to see the congestion pricing component of the package to manage demand. There is compelling research from Matthew Barth and Kanok Boriboonsomisin at UC Riverside on the GHG benefits of congestion pricing. They measured the additional GHG impacts of congestion as being quite significant, and modeled that pricing could reduce GHG impacts from vehicles by 7-12%. When paired with other measures to maintain steady speeds, such as enforcement of speed limits, this could reach as much as 30%. Of course, we’ll need to hold ODOT’s feet to the fire to make sure congestion pricing is applied correctly; that gets to the accountability components of the package, which are good (though our coalition has suggested amendments to make them even better).”