Oregon’s Transportation Bill

We created this helpful infographic to walk you through what’s proposed in Oregon’s transportation funding package, House Bill 2017-3.

Transportation bill offers key pieces for Oregon’s future + more work to be done

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Salem area dedicates Good Cents, celebrates Bottle Bill

This 360 video allows you to move the camera with a mouse, pad or on the YouTube app on your
December 17, 2018, 4:55 pm
tonyh

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Clean Energy Jobs bill summary shows strong collaboration

PORTLAND – New details of the Clean Energy Jobs bill show the culmination of meaningful and open discussion with Oregon’s stakeholders, who stand to benefit from thousands of new jobs and millions of dollars invested in communities impacted by climate change.

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Clean Energy Jobs bill gains buzz

People packed Hearing room F inside the Oregon State Capitol on Sept. 18 as a joint House and Senate committee began what we’re expecting to be next year’s key legislative proposal: Clean Energy Jobs.
September 20, 2017, 10:10 pm
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Oregon

Video: Oregon’s Beach Bill Celebrated

 Thanks to visionary leaders, Oregon’s beaches are open to the public, the only state to create a people’s coast. Watch this video, produced by Visit Tillamook Coast and Sea Legs Media in honor of t
June 27, 2017, 4:00 pm
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Transportation bill offers key pieces for Oregon’s future + more work to be done

The Oregon Legislature’s Joint Committee on T
June 1, 2017, 4:03 pm
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OEC Member Profile: Bill Sweat, Co-Owner and Founder, Winderlea Vineyard and Winery

“Second careers, a well-planned next chapter, the pursuit of a shared passion” – this is how Bill Sweat describes his life in Oregon as co-owner of Winderlea, a boutique winery specializing in the limited production of pinot noir and chardonnay. Bill and his wife, Donna, fell in love with pinot noir in the early 1990s. They found the characteristics they most loved about it in Oregon’s pinot noir, and relocated from Boston to Dundee in 2006.
May 11, 2017, 6:07 pm
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Beach Bill 50th Anniversary

By Kevin Kasowski, OEC Staff Saturday, May 13, Oregonians will be celebrating a dramatic moment that happened 50 years ago and played a pivotal role in establishing Oregon’s environmental legacy and the quality of life we enjoy today. It was 1967. Before the Clean Water Act. Before the Clean Air Act. Before EPA. Before the Oregon Environmental Council (
May 9, 2017, 10:51 pm
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New Change for Oregon’s Bottle Bill

by Kevin Kasowski, Director of Foundations and Corporate Relations Whenever I travel outside of Oregon, I appreciate living here even more. It’s not just the greenery, the c
March 31, 2017, 9:55 pm
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Climate Change Coming Home with Bill Bradbury

On March 8th, the Chetco Community Public Library and Friends of the Chetco Library in Brookings, OR, present “Climate Change Coming Home”, a presentation by Bill Bradbury. The former Oregon Secretary of State and State Senator (and former OEC board member) will discuss climate change and its effects on our region. He’ll also be available to answer questions from community members. Currently serving as one of Oregon’s two representatives to the Northwest Power and Conse
January 13, 2017, 11:28 pm
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Is your septic tank leaking? We’ve got a bill for that!

OEC is celebrating Governor Brown’s signing of SB 1563 this week for the benefit of Oregon’s rivers, streams and coastal waters. This bill, sponsored by Senator Roblan, helps low- and middle-income families confront leaking or failing septic systems. It creates a low-interest loan program, to be administered by DEQ, for “repairing, upgrading or evaluating residential or small business on-site septic systems.” Properly functioning septic systems treat sewage to
May 27, 2016, 6:08 pm
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4 Replies to "Oregon's Transportation Bill"

  • Garlynn Woodsong
    June 7, 2017 (4:12 pm)
    Reply

    Why is there no mention of the climate impact of this bill, either by the Leg analysis, or especially by OEC’s breakdown of the bill’s impacts???

    • Amy Lewin
      June 7, 2017 (10:47 pm)
      Reply

      A great point to make Garlynn! We absolutely agree that the package must reduce GHGs. Here’s a response from our policy experts:

      With all the pieces just coming together last week, there’s not time to do a full GHG analysis; but prior to the bill being released our team did look at the expected transit and EV investment. What we know from that analysis is that the transit investment is important and that it moves the GHG needle the most if the buses are electrified over time. In fact, there’s a co-benefit to conversion to electric buses, which is that an EV bus fleet requires less service and has far lower fuel costs than a diesel fleet, thus those savings can be plowed back into additional transit service. The package does require the state’s largest transit agencies to move to alternative fuels. With regard to the EV analysis, it showed that we need a larger investment in EV incentives than is currently in the package or in the EV companion bill, HB 2704. So we must push hard to make sure that the investment begins this session and is upped over time. Another important climate piece of the package is bike/ped (including Safe Routes to School), which is funded in the package but needs improvements that our coalition is pushing for.

      The biggest climate question is the new road capacity funded in the package. New capacity fills up quickly if not managed, so we’re pleased to see the congestion pricing component of the package to manage demand. There is compelling research from Matthew Barth and Kanok Boriboonsomisin at UC Riverside on the GHG benefits of congestion pricing. They measured the additional GHG impacts of congestion as being quite significant, and modeled that pricing could reduce GHG impacts from vehicles by 7-12%. When paired with other measures to maintain steady speeds, such as enforcement of speed limits, this could reach as much as 30%. Of course, we’ll need to hold ODOT’s feet to the fire to make sure congestion pricing is applied correctly; that gets to the accountability components of the package, which are good (though our coalition has suggested amendments to make them even better).”


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