Water Action

Take action for your river – at home, in your community, and at the Capitol


Make Your Voice Heard for the Future of Oregon Groundwater!

wetland in the malheur national wildlife refuge with dry grass and clouds in the blue sky
When you think about water in Oregon, you might think about the Rogue River, Pacific Coast or Malheur Lake. However, some of the most important bodies of water in our state aren't visible to the naked eye: they're under our feet. Almost 90% of our state’s public water systems rely at least in part on groundwater ecosystems. Snow and rain collect into aquifers made of underground layers of sand, fractured rocks and other permeable materials, forming the groundwater so crucial to Oregon communities. Right now, big changes are on the horizon for Oregon groundwater. You ...

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New Water Justice Report: A Launching Point for Research and Policy Development 

It should go without saying that clean water is foundational to every aspect of our lives. But the reality is that there are far too many people in Oregon who struggle to have their water needs met every day. For some it’s poor water quality, for others, it’s lack of access to water, unaffordable water costs, or diminished natural resources.  These water justice challenges are highlighted in a new report that builds on our work in the Oregon Water Futures Collaborative and expands the base of evidence demonstrating how frontline communities are impacted by Oregon’s ...

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A Natural Vision for Water Part 4: Investing in Our Future

Prineville wetlands project - built ponds of water spread out on the landscape next to the natural path of a river.
The fourth part of our Natural Vision for Water series outlines HOW to invest in natural infrastructure as the foundation for thriving Oregon communities.

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A Natural Vision for Water Part 3: Advancing Health and Environmental Justice

Sign on fence post reading, "Irrigated with recycled water".
Inclusive natural infrastructure planning can advance health, justice, and community power. But how do we get there?

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A Natural Vision for Water Part 1 – Common Natural Infrastructure Challenges, Opportunities for Action, and Case Studies

A new report from Oregon Environmental Council and Willamette Partnership demonstrates the opportunity to invest in natural infrastructure as a solution to Oregon’s infrastructure challenges.

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The Story of Plastics

On World Oceans Day, let’s talk about the 8 million metric tons of plastic that ends up in the oceans every year and what you can do about it.

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Reducing Your Impact on Oregon’s Waterways from Home

World Water Day is this Sunday, March 22, and even as we're adapting to a new normal of social distancing and working from home, there are lots of ways that you can do your part to protect our air, land and water.

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Hold The Salt: Options For Keeping Your Sidewalk Ice-Free

Winter weather in Oregon can be unpredictable. With this latest cold snap, it is time to start thinking about how we combat snow/ice on our sidewalks and driveways. The cost of so much salt Salt is used in many parts of the country because it lowers the freezing temperature of water and therefore can help accelerate the melting process of snow and ice. However, after it’s spread on roads or sidewalks, all of that salt has to go somewhere, and most of it washes into the storm sewer and gets deposited into the nearest river.  There, it can harm freshwater fish, ...

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Protect Oregon’s drinking water from toxic PFAS: Ask Congressman Walden to designate PFAS as a “hazardous chemical”

Per-and Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a category of hazardous chemicals that are currently designated as “contaminants” by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  To protect human health, Congress must designate PFAS as hazardous chemicals, which will speed up the identification, cleanup and monitoring of PFAS contaminated sites under federal Superfund law. What are PFAS and why should you be concerned? PFAS are a group of 47,000 synthetic chemicals that are known as ‘forever chemicals’ due to their persistent nature in the environment. They ...

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Let’s talk about microplastics

Your closet and dresser drawers are full of plastic - and not the kind from packaging, straws and shopping bags. Some of our favorite fabrics, whether it’s techy workout gear or your fleece winter pullover, can release upwards of 730,000 synthetic particles per wash. When these synthetic fibers end up in our waterways they become a form of microplastic pollution. Microplastics are exactly what they sound like: tiny pieces of plastic that result from the inevitable breakdown of the plastic products around us. As they get smaller and smaller, microplastics become ...

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