20 results for author: Tony Hernandez


Clean Energy Jobs: Take action Feb. 12

Climate change continues.We’ve endured hot summers and threats of wildfires not far from our doorsteps in 2017. Let’s let our legislators know during this upcoming session they have the power to lead the nation with innovative programs that will mitigate rising temperatures and extreme weather patterns. Oregon Environmental Council, Renew Oregon and other partners are hosting a Clean Energy Jobs Lobby Day on Feb. 12, where you can speak with your representative and senator about climate change. Now’s a critical time to encourage our state leaders to adopt the Clean Energy Jobs bill, a decade-long effort to protect our lands and invest in ...

Clean Energy Jobs bill summary shows strong collaboration

PORTLAND - New details of the Clean Energy Jobs bill show the culmination of meaningful and open discussion with Oregon’s stakeholders, who stand to benefit from thousands of new jobs and millions of dollars invested in communities impacted by climate change.“Oregon Environmental Council applauds all our state leaders and Oregonians involved in this process. Today’s summary shows that careful attention has been made to make sure all our communities will benefit from limits on climate pollution,” said Climate Program Director Jana Gastellum. “A newly proposed governance model provides fair representation of urban and rural communities, of ...

Good news: Electric vehicles now take you the distance

By Belinda McFadgen Guest authorIf you’re tired of the exhaust fumes, noise, and climate-damaging emissions from your typical gasoline car, the electric vehicle is a great option for your future ride.Good reasons exist for going electric. Switching from gas reduces air pollution and carbon emissions so electric vehicle engines run cleaner and quieter than gas cars. Electric cars also have lower costs because they require no routine maintenance: no oil changes are needed or spark plugs replaced like in gasoline engines. It is also cheaper than ever to make the switch, with an Oregon rebate of up to $2,500 to supplement the current federal ...

Clean Energy Jobs energizes lawmakers

Legislative Days wrapped up this month. More than a decade of hard work continues for our state leaders who are crafting the final touches of the Clean Energy Jobs proposal for 2018.Oregonians continue to support our champions working to create innovative programs. Since September, four legislative work groups have each held meetings filled with hundreds of observers and participants from a variety of interests. Business, equity, environmental, tribal, rural and so many other advocates have helped lawmakers continue to craft this bipartisan proposal.As 2017 wraps up, legislators and state officials are using three-month's worth of discussion ...

Gov. Brown’s leadership to reach international stage

Gov. Kate Brown and Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler trumpeted West Coast leadership toward a clean-energy economy in front of a few dozen supporters and reporters Monday at Field Office, an energy-efficient office complex under construction in Northwest Portland, featuring solar power arrays and electric car charging stations.Monday’s press conference centered on state and local leadership guiding Oregon toward more jobs by fostering renewable energy development, construction of buildings that generate enough electricity to power themselves, more access to electric vehicles and making our communities healthier.The governor announced she plans ...

A look back at carbon pricing in Oregon

Oregon has been working on varying forms of legislation to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions with a limit and price on pollution for well over a decade. Clean Energy Jobs is the final product and ready to be passed in 2018.

Help sway the EPA for clean car standards to stay

It’s personal.President Donald Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency has shown signs it wants to roll back Obama-era rules that thousands of Oregonians and dozens of Oregon businesses successfully achieved before they were adopted nationwide.At stake, rules that would “eliminate as much as six billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions and save consumers more than $1 trillion at the pump over the lifetime of the cars affected,” according to a solid story by The New Times. The piece reviews the history of how California and 12 other states, including Oregon, insisted automakers curb pollution.Those companies, not long ...

Clean Energy Jobs bill gains buzz

People packed Hearing room F inside the Oregon State Capitol on Sept. 18 as a joint House and Senate committee began what we’re expecting to be next year’s key legislative proposal: Clean Energy Jobs.A handful of people stood along the walls of the hearing room as they listened to Sen. Michael Dembrow and Rep. Ken Helm describe how lawmakers plan to move forward with the bill that’s more than 10 years in the making. Gov. Kate Brown has already given statements of support and expressed a desire for its passage in 2018.Oregonians are interested. Our leaders are discussing. Our climate future remains hopeful.Oregon Public Broadcas...

Oregon shows resiliency during, after solar eclipse

Overall, Monday's solar eclipse lived up to the wonderful hype and not much of the fears. Hundreds of thousands of visitors flocked to Oregon to join millions of residents and bask in the glow of a beautiful August day. Many, including myself, stared up in awe, smiling from the memorable experience.Our photographer Dave Palmer captured stunning photos of the celestial event from his vantage point in Salem at the L.B. Day Amphitheater at the Oregon State Fairgrounds. OMSI (Oregon Museum of Science and Industry) hosted the sold-out event at the amphitheater, which holds more than 8,000 people. (View his slideshow @oeconline - Instagram.)Feel ...

Heatwave gives us all pause for concern

Beads of sweat ran down my forehead as I walked along a downtown Portland sidewalk with a colleague at lunchtime Aug. 1, my first day of employment at Oregon Environmental Council.In a state that’s seen its share of drought, I had hoped the near-triple-digit heat under the sun would quickly evaporate the pesky perspiration seeping into my collared shirt. I’m not that lucky.I mention that minor discomfort because I’ve taken last week’s heatwave, combined with the timing of my new employment, as a message from Mother Nature: Get to work.Oregon Environmental Council and our partners have great stories coming in the following months. ...