26 results for author: Stacey Dalgaard


Tiny Plants with a Toxic Punch

Summer is here and it's time to jump in the water - but wait - what's that pea-green scum floating on the surface? A harmful algae bloom.

White House Risks Health of Our Water and Our Communities

Yesterday the Trump Administration put the sources of drinking water for more than 4 million Oregonians at greater risk, along with the streams and wetlands that filter pollution and provide habitat for wildlife, by starting the process to repeal the Clean Water Rule.

A Roadmap for Managing Our Water

UPDATE: The Oregon Water Resources Department received 250 comments from individual Oregonians on the Integrated Water Resources Strategy - that's 12x more than when the strategy was originally developed! Thanks to your advocacy, the Department heard the message loud and clear: prioritize clean and plentiful water for all Oregonians. Stay tuned for updates on how the final strategy lives up to your demands.It’s hard to think about drought when it’s still raining in June, but Oregon is about to enter its dry season. Although this year’s snowpack looks strong, experts predict that climate change will bring more drought in the future. That’s ...

Restoring Hamilton Creek: The Soltaus’ Story

As early spring blooms pop open and a great blue heron takes off across the water, Glen Soltau walks the trails on his property along Hamilton Creek outside of Lebanon, Ore. When Glen and his wife, Leslie, bought the property in 1992, Hamilton Creek was overrun with invasive blackberries, some growing as tall as 10-12 feet high, and cows walked in the streambed disrupting fish habitat and eroding the banks.Now rows of native willow, dogwood and elderberry have replaced the blackberries. Indian plum provides an early season nectar source for hummingbirds. Beavers build seasonal dams that increase the area for Glen and Leslie to paddle their kayaks. ...

Press Release: Stakeholders Weigh In – Why Water Can’t Wait

Today water resources experts, Tribal leaders, farmers, and environmental advocates told legislators: we must start accounting for how much water we have and how quickly it is being consumed for the security of Oregon’s economy and way of life.

Water Can’t Wait

Even as we experience one of the wettest winters in a decade, the future of Oregon’s water resources is uncertain.